Permanent Link to 1-800-Recycling.com and El Quintero Announce Partnership

 Wednesday 18 August 2010   1-800-Recycling.com Partners with GenGreen Los Angeles (August 17, 2010) – It was announced today that 1-800-Recycling.com, an interactive nationwide company dedicated to simplifying and enhancing the consumer recycling experience, has partnered with GenGreenLife.com, a leading online resource for people looking to live a locally-focused, environmentally conscious lifestyle. The two organizations have agreed to pool their resources and exchange recycling location listings from their respective databases. Via its mobile App, online resource and phone service, 1-800-Recycling provides information about recycling services and facilities to anyone, anywhere by zip code. Designed to make the recycling process easy and more accessible, 1-800-Recycling.com will now also be recommending GenGreen approved recyclers as responsible locations for the deposit of recycling materials. GenGreen created and maintains the largest database of accredited green businesses and organizations in North America, with a growing group of almost 75,000 companies currently in their system, covering everything from farmers markets to solar panel companies. Of the partnership, Charisse McAuliffe, Founder and CEO of GenGreen said, “We are very pleased to be working with 1-800-Recycling. At GenGreen, we recognize that we are not in this alone, creating partnerships with like-minded groups, such as 1-800-Recycing, we can do our part in helping spread their important message”. “We are extremely proud to be partnering with a consumer friendly and passionately green resource such as GenGreen,” said John Shegerian, Chairman and CEO of Electronic Recyclers International, the nation’s leading recycler of electronics and e-waste, and parent company of 1-800-Recycling.com. “1-800-Recycling shares a common mission with GenGreen – to provide users with information that helps them live a greener life. By pooling our expansive nationwide databases together, we will now be able to further increase our geographic resource footprint – helping more people in more places to recycle responsibly. We are extremely proud of this collaboration and what we will be able to accomplish together!” 1-800-Recycling.com provides users with nationwide outreach to help users find recycling locations nearest to them (every zip code in the country is covered) for whatever it is they wish to recycle. For more information on recycling needs, visit www.electronicrecyclers.com, http://1800recycling.comor www.urbanmining.org. # # # 1-800-Recycling.com provides users with nationwide outreach to help users find recycling locations nearest to them (every zip code in the country is covered) for whatever it is they wish to recycle. Through its iPod App, 1-800-Recycling.com website and 1-800-Recycling phone service, users are directed to responsible recyclers of electronics, tires, oil, paint, glass, plastic, wood, mattresses, carpet, junk – almost anything that can be recycled. Electronic Recyclers International (ERI), the nation’s leading recycler of electronics and e- waste, is the parent company of 1-800-Recycling.com. GenGreen has assembled the largest database of environmental and healthy living businesses in North America. There are over 75,000 approved business members listed on GenGreenLife.com as of August 2010. GenGreen helps these businesses by guiding them in their green practices, and promoting their goods and services to the environmentally conscious consumer through their website GenGreenLife.com and their mobile applications “Find […]

Facts About LED Lights

   | Tuesday 10 August 2010   This Little Light of Mine…Lasts 25 Years! Remember earlier this year when you had to climb up a ladder, and screw in all those light bulbs one by one? It’s kind of tedious and a bit annoying knowing that you will need to do this again as each light bulb, inevitably, burns out. Now, imagine if you never had to go up there and do that again. No more changing the light bulbs every 3 months or having part of your hallway lit for a week because you just do not feel like going to the store and buying one light bulb that you know will need to be replaced again before the year is over. With the Light-emitting diodes (LED) bulbs, not only do you save massive amounts of energy, but it is also the “set it and forget it” of household lighting. An LED bulb can replace any of your typical light bulbs in your home or office. For example, your typical 60 watt light bulb would be replaced with an LED bulb that uses only 6 watts of energy. It will fit in all of your standard household lighting fixtures and is constructed out of recycled materials. If you feel like setting the mood, many LED lights are also dimmable. Compact Fluorescent light bulbs (CFLs) are on the market as an energy efficient alternative and were the most common method of replacement. However, CFLs do have their downside. The type of light produced from a CFL bulb can cause some individuals to feel queasy if around them for an extended period of time and they have low durability. Also, CFLs have enough mercury in them to contaminate 6000 gallons of fresh water if they are broken. On the other hand, LED light bulbs are free from ultraviolet, mercury, and lead contaminants. With typical household usage, an LED bulb lasts 25 years! Which means once you put one of these lights in, the bulb will most likely never have to be changed again. Quick LED Fact – If every American household switched just one 60W light bulb to a 6W LED light, $1.4 Billion in electricity costs would be saved annually. This Blog was contributed by one of our users at GenGreenLife.com

To Roth Or Not To Roth

  | Monday 9 August 2010   To Roth or not to Roth – Many people are familiar with a Roth IRA. Put money away, after taxes are paid on those earnings, let the money grow tax differed in the IRA, then take tax-free distributions of the earnings. Not a bad deal, lets go through it again. Earn $40,000. Pay taxes on all $40,000. Put $5000 into Roth IRA, after tax. $5000 grows to $75,000 over your lifetime. Take original $5000 out of taxes were paid when that money was earned. Take $70,000 tax-free. Nothing due on earnings. In a regular IRA you put $5000, before taxes, from earnings into same investments in IRA, grows to same $75,000 over time. Then pay taxes on all $75,000 when taking it out of IRA. Pay taxes now on $5,000 and nothing later, $70,000 distribution tax-free. Or, Pay no taxes now on $5000 and pay taxes on full $75,000 taxable distribution. Seems fairly straight forward, especially if you think taxes will be the same or possibly higher when you retire. Here is where it gets interesting. A Roth IRA has earnings limitations. If you earn over $120,000 as a single person, or over $177,000 as a married person, you can not make a Roth contribution. Tough luck. But wait.. Making an employee contribution into a Roth bucket in your 401(k) has no earnings limitation. You can put full employee contribution into the Roth bucket not just $5,000. If you earn $200,000, are over age 50, you can put $22,000 into the Roth 401(k) at work. In 25 years that $22,000, earning 6% grows to $94421.16. The $22,000 had taxes paid when earned, but the growth $72,421.16 is never subject to taxes. I’d call that the best kept secret out there. This is an example and anyone interested in further information should contact a registered financial advisor, or ask about a Social(k) 401(k) / 403(b) at work. This Blog was written by our partners at Social K a GenGreen Certified Business

Busting the Green vs Clean Mentality

  | Saturday 7 August 2010   So I have this dear friend who just won’t give up the bottled water habit. I have told her about the Great Pacific Garbage Patch, about the fact that it takes 700 years for a plastic bottle to begin to decompose, and yet, when I was visiting with her recently, she and her family went through bottle after plastic bottle of water. Since I was a guest in her house, I felt it was not my place to question her or lecture her for the millionth time. I know she cares deeply about the planet’s future, so why the disconnect? We were sitting outside in the hot sun, and my friend mentioned she was thirsty. I asked her if she wanted some water and she said she did. I pulled out my reusable stainless steel water bottle filled with ice cold tap water and she looked at it and politely declined. Another friend pulled out a store bought bottled water and she immediately accepted that offer and rushed to quench her thirst. I’m pretty sure she thought my water bottle was not clean – not to mention what she thought of the tap water inside. I’m wondering how many people have not given up some of their most wasteful habits not because of the small inconveniences involved, but because they like things nice and new and clean. I know I had to suppress many of my obsessive compulsive tendencies when I began my journey to go green. So I’ve put together a Green vs. Clean list with some myth busters: 1) Bottled Water vs. Tap Water. Myth: Bottled water is better for you. Fact: Bottled water is less regulated than tap water, and in a 2008 study by the Environmental Working Group, 38 contaminants were found in 10 of the top brands of bottled water. Also, plastic bottles leach harmful chemicals into the water. Finally, if you like things clean, then why add to the huge amount of plastic that exists in our oceans and landfills? That stuff is not going anywhere, and eventually it will show up on your beach and in your backyard. That’s pretty gross. 2) The Disinfection Obsession. Myth: Green cleaning products aren’t as effective as antibacterials. Fact: Unless you are a surgeon requiring a sterile environment, good old soap and water or even home made concoctions like vinegar and baking soda are just as effective cleaning agents as antibacterials – sans the side effects of toxic chemicals, indoor air pollution, and water pollution. These don’t sound so very clean to me. 3) Use and Toss. Myth: Single use products are more hygienic than reusable ones. Actually, you can get a better clean from cloth towel than a paper towel, without the paper waste and mess. Cloth towels are more absorbent and stronger and therefore are more effective at getting the grime out of your kitchen. Use and wash is still better than use and toss, and if your […]

Natural Pesticides

   | Thursday 5 August 2010   This year, we planted a vegetable garden and have been in constant amazement at the miracle of life happening in our back yard. I was so enthralled with my first full-grown snow pea, that I had to take a picture of it to share with you. However, in addition to the life that is our plants, there is other not-as-welcome life: the inevitable garden pests. Critters with teeth have been nibbling and insects have added decorative holes to our greens. Wanting to keep to our commitment of maintaining a natural garden, we refuse to buy pesticides, and have planted thing like marigolds and hot peppers, which are supposed to deter interlopers. However, it became apparent that we had to take a bit more aggressive action, so I pulled out the neem oil, which I keep in stock for the production of some of my bath and body products. Neem oil is extracted from the tropical neem tree. I had read a while ago that it is a very effective insecticide, miticide and fungicide, and is listed as okay for use in organic production. According to Plant-care.com, neem oil has the following features: Broad spectrum insecticide/fungicide/miticide controls insects and mites including whitefly, aphid and scale, Controls fungal diseases including black spot, rust, mildew and scab. For indoor/outdoor use on ornamental plants, flowers, vegetables, trees, shrubs and fruit and nut crops. Mountain Rose Herbs says that it biodegrades rapidly in sunlight and within a few weeks in the soil. Neem oil has very low toxicity to humans and pets, but it is not recommended for internal use. I had also read that rosemary and lavender are effective pesticides, plus they smell better than neem, so I decided to include the in my natural pesticide. Here is my recipe: Mix 1 gallon of water with 2 tablespoons of neem, and 1 teaspoon each rosemary and lavender essential oils (I used organic version of all the oils). You can also add a couple of tablespoons of phosphate-free liquid dishwashing soap. Mix thoroughly and pour into a spray bottle. Spray over every part of your plants, mixing frequently to keep the oils and water from separating. By the way, these Sprayco spray bottles, which I buy at my local family-owned hardware store, are made in the US from recycled materials and provide jobs for handicapped individuals.